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...so after torturing myself with the shifting/clutch issue for a week, I figured it's time to get moving with getting it ripped out and shipped to good ol' TX for a tuneup. Thanks to whoever came up with that diy clutch puller tool, that thing worked like a charm! I have to say though, just getting the cover off was a complete PITA, even with using evan165's video for reference. I'm guessing there wont be any roadside belt repairs if anything ever happens with this gator. ;) I did notice that whoever had this thing before didn't bother putting half the trim panel screws and even left off the pin for the bed latch. Just more stuff to have to buy to get 'er right.... Anyhow, since I have it torn down to this point, is there anything I might want to eyeball before putting it back together?
 

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If it has the original head gaskets from 2012; I would replace those, as they were faulty and failed/will failure. The replacements from JD are much improved. BTW you are more than half way there.........馃榾
 

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If it has the original head gaskets from 2012; I would replace those, as they were faulty and failed/will failure. The replacements from JD are much improved. BTW you are more than half way there.........馃榾
Do you know if it requires pulling the engine? It seems to be good for the moment, but if it's not too terrible, I might jut do it anyhow.
 

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Oh yeah... I also noticed while pulling it apart, that the previous owner didn't even have an air filter . I see the OE part is M170281, but there is a matching Stens part (#102-305) for half the $40 for the JD. The JD isn't a 2 part filter is it?
 

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Do you know if it requires pulling the engine? It seems to be good for the moment, but if it's not too terrible, I might jut do it anyhow.
NO, not at all. Need to pull the bed (you did that already and the driver's side panel), the passenger side panel, the air filter housing, (this exposes the carb cover) pull cover off and then the intake manifold. then pull each head.

Get used to this stuff, even to adjust the carb. Like plucking a chicken.............
 

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Oh yeah... I also noticed while pulling it apart, that the previous owner didn't even have an air filter . I see the OE part is M170281, but there is a matching Stens part (#102-305) for half the $40 for the JD. The JD isn't a 2 part filter is it?
No, the JD part is also one filter. There is no inner filter.
 

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NO, not at all. Need to pull the bed (you did that already and the driver's side panel), the passenger side panel, the air filter housing, (this exposes the carb cover) pull cover off and then the intake manifold. then pull each head.

Get used to this stuff, even to adjust the carb. Like plucking a chicken.............
I'm guessing the blower housing on the side has to come off as well... wasn't quite sure. I'll be glad when my tech manual gets here end of this week. It's a pain having to figure out what comes off where without something to clear that up. Plus, never done a head gasket before. LOL. ;)
 

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I'm guessing the blower housing on the side has to come off as well... wasn't quite sure. I'll be glad when my tech manual gets here end of this week. It's a pain having to figure out what comes off where without something to clear that up. Plus, never done a head gasket before. LOL. ;)
Yes that tech manual is an absolute must. Really helps in plucking this chicken and getting the feathers taken off in the right order!! They had something like a recall on the head gaskets on the 2012. It is possible they were replaced already. It really is not that hard, other than taking all of the stuff off to get to them. You can also adjust the valves while you are doing it. Otherwise just wait until one or both fail. Won't be a disaster, you will just have some back firing, lose of power, etc. when one of them fails. If you take off the oil filling cap and see some smoke coming out of it while it is running, is another clue of a possible gasket failure.
 

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Now that you mention it, it does look like with all the missing trim screws and such...it may have been stripped down to that point already. I'm not seeing any of the signs of a failure, and Since its not a catastrophic issue, I may just button her up when the clutch gets back and see how it holds up for now. Granted its a PITA to disassemble, it could be worse. I'm gonna hit up the dealer I picked it up from and see if he can find out if it was already done as well by the PO.
 

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I see you've already figured out that removing the bed is a good idea when you have to work in back. And, you've already completed one of the most difficult body removal and that's removing the 300 screws holding the clutch/belt cover in place. It's a shame someone left water sitting inside the housing to corrode the clutch.

It's not really terrible to remove the body panels. I think many just expect to go right at things and aren't accustomed to having to remove panels first. Chuck a Torx bit in a cordless drill and those fasteners come out quick and easy. Luckily 98% of the body panels all use the same screw so you can just go crazy without having to keep track of what fastener goes where. What few oddball fasteners there are are easy to spot

Do you have any indication of a head gasket problem? If not I wouldn't bother replacing head gaskets. Many machines had their gaskets replaced under warranty so hopefully yours has already been done.
 

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I see you've already figured out that removing the bed is a good idea when you have to work in back. And, you've already completed one of the most difficult body removal and that's removing the 300 screws holding the clutch/belt cover in place. It's a shame someone left water sitting inside the housing to corrode the clutch.

It's not really terrible to remove the body panels. I think many just expect to go right at things and aren't accustomed to having to remove panels first. Chuck a Torx bit in a cordless drill and those fasteners come out quick and easy. Luckily 98% of the body panels all use the same screw so you can just go crazy without having to keep track of what fastener goes where. What few oddball fasteners there are are easy to spot

Do you have any indication of a head gasket problem? If not I wouldn't bother replacing head gaskets. Many machines had their gaskets replaced under warranty so hopefully yours has already been done.
Yeah. no sign of power loss or backfire yet. Runningwise it seems to be in good shape as far as I can tell. Just the crappy clutch problem to deal with. I'm looking forward to getting it all back together and breaking a new belt in. At least with the arse end stripped, its easy to get everything cleaned up. I cleaned up most of the plastics with a heat gun, removing all the oxidized gray crap. Well worth the time spent.Speaking of cleanup, think there'd be any problem with covering up the engine/electrical and hitting with a pressure washer?
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Yeah. no sign of power loss or backfire yet. Runningwise it seems to be in good shape as far as I can tell. Just the crappy clutch problem to deal with. I'm looking forward to getting it all back together and breaking a new belt in. At least with the arse end stripped, its easy to get everything cleaned up. I cleaned up most of the plastics with a heat gun, removing all the oxidized gray crap. Well worth the time spent.Speaking of cleanup, think there'd be any problem with covering up the engine/electrical and hitting with a pressure washer? View attachment 14281 View attachment 14282
That looks real good ! How exactly do you do it with heat gun?
 

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Your mileage may vary depending on the type of plastic and damage/scratches/etc. But I generally went off something like this video... just be cautious not to overheat it to the point where it burns it. It's somewhat time consuming, and you'll have to likely go over some spots more than once to erase the pattern you may create, but the process seems to be fairly forgiving as long as you don't overdo it. Youll want to make sure you clean/degrease pretty thoroughly since that can mess with the process as well.

How To Restore Faded Plastic Trim Using a Heat Gun
 

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So, I got my clutch back from MBDiagMan, and got everything back together, new belt and an actual air filter to top it off. So far so good! Everything is shifting as it should. Now just have to do a break-in on the belt and put her through the paces. Again, kudos to clutch doc and Brad for the help. I know that clutch was a mess from the neglect, but yall did me good. Many thanks! Also thanks to Dane for the tips on getting that new belt on... it was bear to get on!
 

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I thought my two seater looked funny with the bed and body panels off. The four seater looks even more odd.
 

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I thought my two seater looked funny with the bed and body panels off. The four seater looks even more odd.
Yep, she's odd for sure. Now if the rain would stop here so I could finish breaking that belt in....
 
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