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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've seen a number of posts recently about different rims and tires. First, I'm not addressing what to do after doing a 2" lift. I have no experience there. That means you are around 27" diameter. The displays program the speed correctly up to that point. Additionally, you run out of room in front first. If you have the fender guards, you run out of room faster.

First, the bolt pattern is 5-4.5 That means 5 lug bolts on 4.5" center. If you Google that pattern for rims, you'll get all sorts of stuff for trailers. That's what I use. The stock JD rims have a 1.5-2" positive offset. They are also wider than trailer rims. Trailer rims come with zero offset. Since the typical rims are 15", I've noted no problem using them. Various sites like Tire Rack and Les Schwab will talk about problems with too much positive or negative offset and all prefer zero.

So what rim? Trailer rims come in 5" and 6" widths. The 5" rims are suitable for 205 tires and the 6" are good up to 225s. So if you want to hit 27" overall diameter, you can go with 205-75-15 or 225-70-15. I prefer the later even though I started out with a 5" rim and 205s on the 855D.

Rims come in either steel or aluminum. Either will work right? BE CAREFUL. The stock JD lug bolts are a crazy 7/16-20 thread with a metric head that runs into the bevel. They work fine for steel rims and the aluminum ones JD specs for their stuff. These bolts are not trailer aluminum rim friendly as the head engages the rim which means you torque on something other than the bevel, hence the bolts will loosen.

Center hole on the rim is important too. The best fit is using a rim with a 3.19" center hole. 3.25" will work, but the JD plastic cap fits loosely. Also aluminum rims have a narrow indent for the dust cap which means the JD product is too thick on the lip. Steel dust caps are in order.

SOLUTION: You can buy many things that work. I decided on

- 15x6 5/4.5 Aluminum T08 Black Matte w/Machined Lip - T08-56545MBML rims from RecStuff.com They are 6" wide.

- LUG3K 7/16-20 Tapered Lug Bolts, Fits many Kubota and John Deere UTV's, 17mm Hex from pureoffroad.com

- AM90175 Americana Trailer Wheel Center Cap - Stainless Steel - 3.19" Pilot dust covers from etrailer.com

- 225-70-15 radials from Les Schwab

Results: I use street tires a lot because of the typical firm soil on my spread and lots of road running to the dump, feed store, you name it. Street tires give you a quieter ride, better acceleration, better top end on hills, and wear a lot better than running knobbies on asphalt. I found a good ice/snow rated radial performs better on icy roads vs. the knobbies. That is likely due to much more stiping than on off road tires. I use the knobbies in the winter as we get up to 3-4 feet of snow and I still need to get out to the chicken coop over a path that I make with the snow blower. Les Schwab had no problem giving me the mileage warranty although it would take many years to hit 60K miles.

For a peek at steel rim application, see my 855D Turbo review.

13253
Gator Street.jpg
 

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Thank you @CaptSeabee, this is a very well written and informative article.

Your research and write up will certainly help others in their decision making process.
 

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I accidently put it in the wrong forum but don't know how to move it. Maybe an Admin can help.


You can try to send them a message, if you haven’t done so already ?

I have messaged the Admin before, they have always been responsive to my requests.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Phil. My 225s are 27.5” so yours looks good to go. Looked at the rim. Absolutely need the lug bolts I depicted. JD bevel too short and hex will grind into the rim. You need to get the hex away from the bevel as the rim has a deeper bolt hole vs steel. From what I can tell, all the aluminum trailer rims I looked at will hate JD bolts. Steel doesn’t appear to be a problem due to thinner cross section.
 

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Phil. My 225s are 27.5” so yours looks good to go. Looked at the rim. Absolutely need the lug bolts I depicted. JD bevel too short and hex will grind into the rim. You need to get the hex away from the bevel as the rim has a deeper bolt hole vs steel. From what I can tell, all the aluminum trailer rims I looked at will hate JD bolts. Steel doesn’t appear to be a problem due to thinner cross section.
I understand now I believe. The bolts that you posted have a tapered end like a lug nut. That is the difference.

Thanks!
 

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Hi. Here is another tire option I noticed. General now makes their truck tires for UTV. 27x10R14 6ply. Bfgoodrich also makes the mud terrain in various sizes.


Nice!
 

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So I know that we covered trailer wheels...

What about a set of wheels from a Jeep?

They appear to be plentiful with DOT tires already on them as people lift their jeeps and sell the wheels and tires off cheap.

I from what I have found the 5x4.5 is up till 2006 - from what I can find the bore is 71.5

Do you see any issue with fit of them?
 

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So I know that we covered trailer wheels...



What about a set of wheels from a Jeep?



They appear to be plentiful with DOT tires already on them as people lift their jeeps and sell the wheels and tires off cheap.



I from what I have found the 5x4.5 is up till 2006 - from what I can find the bore is 71.5



Do you see any issue with fit of them?


You may need new lug bolts?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I went for lightweight on the rims as any ounce you remove, the better acceleration you get because you are overcoming less inertia. So heavy steel with heavy rubber will lead to a lethargic, especially uphill, situation. It isn't as important on the gas Gators but very noticeable on the diesels. Even so, a street tire on a steel rim will move out quicker than a knobby simply due to less friction on the road. I chose to optimize where I could.

Re Jeep rims. I've heard of them being used as they should work fine. Usually some rust cleanup and new paint is in order.
 

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I went for lightweight on the rims as any ounce you remove, the better acceleration you get because you are overcoming less inertia. So heavy steel with heavy rubber will lead to a lethargic, especially uphill, situation. It isn't as important on the gas Gators but very noticeable on the diesels. Even so, a street tire on a steel rim will move out quicker than a knobby simply due to less friction on the road. I chose to optimize where I could.

Re Jeep rims. I've heard of them being used as they should work fine. Usually some rust cleanup and new paint is in order.
That makes a lot of sense.

Found a buddy with as set of alloy stockers that he wants to upgrade so I think I will give them a shot for the free price tag.

Thanks again for the incite.
 

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I've seen a number of posts recently about different rims and tires. First, I'm not addressing what to do after doing a 2" lift. I have no experience there. That means you are around 27" diameter. The displays program the speed correctly up to that point. Additionally, you run out of room in front first. If you have the fender guards, you run out of room faster.

First, the bolt pattern is 5-4.5 That means 5 lug bolts on 4.5" center. If you Google that pattern for rims, you'll get all sorts of stuff for trailers. That's what I use. The stock JD rims have a 1.5-2" negative offset. They are also wider than trailer rims. Trailer rims come with zero offset. Since the typical rims are 15", I've noted no problem using them. Various sites like Tire Rack and Les Schwab will talk about problems with too much positive or negative offset and all prefer zero.

So what rim? Trailer rims come in 5" and 6" widths. The 5" rims are suitable for 205 tires and the 6" are good up to 225s. So if you want to hit 27" overall diameter, you can go with 205-75-15 or 225-70-15. I prefer the later even though I started out with a 5" rim and 205s on the 855D.

Rims come in either steel or aluminum. Either will work right? BE CAREFUL. The stock JD lug bolts are a crazy 7/16-20 thread with a metric head that runs into the bevel. They work fine for steel rims and the aluminum ones JD specs for their stuff. These bolts are not trailer aluminum rim friendly as the head engages the rim which means you torque on something other than the bevel, hence the bolts will loosen.

Center hole on the rim is important too. The best fit is using a rim with a 3.19" center hole. 3.25" will work, but the JD plastic cap fits loosely. Also aluminum rims have a narrow indent for the dust cap which means the JD product is too thick on the lip. Steel dust caps are in order.

SOLUTION: You can buy many things that work. I decided on

- 15x6 5/4.5 Aluminum T08 Black Matte w/Machined Lip - T08-56545MBML rims from RecStuff.com They are 6" wide.

- LUG3K 7/16-20 Tapered Lug Bolts, Fits many Kubota and John Deere UTV's, 17mm Hex from pureoffroad.com

- AM90175 Americana Trailer Wheel Center Cap - Stainless Steel - 3.19" Pilot dust covers from etrailer.com

- 225-70-15 radials from Les Schwab

Results: I use street tires a lot because of the typical firm soil on my spread and lots of road running to the dump, feed store, you name it. Street tires give you a quieter ride, better acceleration, better top end on hills, and wear a lot better than running knobbies on asphalt. I found a good ice/snow rated radial performs better on icy roads vs. the knobbies. That is likely due to much more stiping than on off road tires. I use the knobbies in the winter as we get up to 3-4 feet of snow and I still need to get out to the chicken coop over a path that I make with the snow blower. Les Schwab had no problem giving me the mileage warranty although it would take many years to hit 60K miles.

So grab whatever configuration that will help you get more out of your gator. Besides the picture here of my 225s on my 865R, you can see a 205 steel rim application photo in my 855D Turbo review. Have fun.
Does anyone know where I can find used OEM 14" wheels for my 2011 JD Gator 825i? My 825i has the plain black wheels and I am looking for either the black or aluminum 5 spoke wheel. I found a new set with Bighorn 2.0 tires for $575 at a JD dealer in Comber, Ontario but the shipping was going to be around $500. Here is the link to what I am looking for.

https://www.agdealer.com/detail/872550/used-john-deere-gator-tires-miscellaneous.
 

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Sweet!
 

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I've seen a number of posts recently about different rims and tires. First, I'm not addressing what to do after doing a 2" lift. I have no experience there. That means you are around 27" diameter. The displays program the speed correctly up to that point. Additionally, you run out of room in front first. If you have the fender guards, you run out of room faster.

First, the bolt pattern is 5-4.5 That means 5 lug bolts on 4.5" center. If you Google that pattern for rims, you'll get all sorts of stuff for trailers. That's what I use. The stock JD rims have a 1.5-2" positive offset. They are also wider than trailer rims. Trailer rims come with zero offset. Since the typical rims are 15", I've noted no problem using them. Various sites like Tire Rack and Les Schwab will talk about problems with too much positive or negative offset and all prefer zero.

So what rim? Trailer rims come in 5" and 6" widths. The 5" rims are suitable for 205 tires and the 6" are good up to 225s. So if you want to hit 27" overall diameter, you can go with 205-75-15 or 225-70-15. I prefer the later even though I started out with a 5" rim and 205s on the 855D.

Rims come in either steel or aluminum. Either will work right? BE CAREFUL. The stock JD lug bolts are a crazy 7/16-20 thread with a metric head that runs into the bevel. They work fine for steel rims and the aluminum ones JD specs for their stuff. These bolts are not trailer aluminum rim friendly as the head engages the rim which means you torque on something other than the bevel, hence the bolts will loosen.

Center hole on the rim is important too. The best fit is using a rim with a 3.19" center hole. 3.25" will work, but the JD plastic cap fits loosely. Also aluminum rims have a narrow indent for the dust cap which means the JD product is too thick on the lip. Steel dust caps are in order.

SOLUTION: You can buy many things that work. I decided on

- 15x6 5/4.5 Aluminum T08 Black Matte w/Machined Lip - T08-56545MBML rims from RecStuff.com They are 6" wide.

- LUG3K 7/16-20 Tapered Lug Bolts, Fits many Kubota and John Deere UTV's, 17mm Hex from pureoffroad.com

- AM90175 Americana Trailer Wheel Center Cap - Stainless Steel - 3.19" Pilot dust covers from etrailer.com

- 225-70-15 radials from Les Schwab

Results: I use street tires a lot because of the typical firm soil on my spread and lots of road running to the dump, feed store, you name it. Street tires give you a quieter ride, better acceleration, better top end on hills, and wear a lot better than running knobbies on asphalt. I found a good ice/snow rated radial performs better on icy roads vs. the knobbies. That is likely due to much more stiping than on off road tires. I use the knobbies in the winter as we get up to 3-4 feet of snow and I still need to get out to the chicken coop over a path that I make with the snow blower. Les Schwab had no problem giving me the mileage warranty although it would take many years to hit 60K miles.

For a peek at steel rim application, see my 855D Turbo review.

View attachment 13253 View attachment 11293
Holy mackerel, that's about all anybody could want to know about wheels for their machine. Well written and explained well. Thanks a bunch
 
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